MEET THE SUGAR GLIDER

Sugar gliders are marsupials related to possums from Australia. Although they do enjoy human company, they are not the right pet for everyone as they are very sensitive, require a lot of space, and are complicated to care for.

High
High
High
High

Lifespan

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12 - 15 years

Diet Difficulty

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High

Good With Kids

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No

Care Difficulty

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High

Space Requirement

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Large

Cleanliness

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Messy

Time Needed Outside Cage

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High

Human Interaction Needs

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High

Potty Trainability

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Low

Cuddliness

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High

CARE GUIDE

SUPPLY LIST

ADOPTABLE

SUGAR GLIDERS

ENCLOSURE REQUIREMENTS

Minimum Dimensions

One - two glider: 15 cubic ft

Add 5 cubic ft for each additional glider.

MNPPR Recommends

Double Critter Nation

Madagascar Sugar Glider Cage

Critter Nation cages are easy to clean, customize, and move around. The Madagascar Sugar Glider Cage is also a good option. The more space you can provide, the better!

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Other Notes

Wire-sided cages are preferable because they provide plenty of ventilation and options for climbing.  It’s important to make sure the bars are coated with a safe ‘powder coated’ high-quality finish in case the gliders chew the bars.

Bar spacing should be no more than 0.5” to prevent escape.

 

All cage floors, ramps, and levels should be solid or covered with fleece since standing on wire can cause injuries and bumblefoot.

Anti-pill fleece blankets or liners are the safest options for sugar glider bedding because they may eat other types and get intestinal blockages and their nails can easily get stuck in other types of fabric. Use the anti-pill fleece to line the cage and cover any exposed wire floors.

ENRICHMENT REQUIREMENTS

Essentials

water bottle

food bowl

lots of chew toys (wood or lava)

wheel

at least one shelter/hide

bonding pouch

Variety

hanging ropes

bird toys

fabric cubes

fleece vines

bird branches

jingle balls

Barrel of Monkeys

PVC tubes

homemade toys

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Other Items

hammocks

pet bed

pet carrier

anti-pill fleece

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FEEDING REQUIREMENTS

Staple Diet

Sugar gliders have very specific dietary needs that require a delicate balance of vitamins and minerals, along with a 2:1 calcium to phosphorus ratio. Because this can be difficult to understand and correctly calculate, MNPPR recommends feeding Critter Love® Complete - Sugar Glider Staple or Exotic Nutrition® HPW (High Protein Wombaroo) Original diet. Pellet food should never be used because it can cause oral abscesses and is often nutritionally unbalanced.

Fruit and Vegetable Salad

Diets that contain both a fruit and vegetable salad mix and a commercial protein component are the best way to provide your pet with a well-rounded diet. Follow the directions on your chosen protein source to make sure you're providing the correct ratio of foods. The Critter Love and oHPW diets recommend combining 1 tablespoon of protein mixture with 2 tablespoons of a fruit and vegetable salad per glider. You can find suggestions on fruit and vegetable mixes (or purchase pre-made salads) at Critter Love's website here critterlove.com/salad-mixtures. Many people prefer to create large salad batches and freeze them to make their daily feeding routine easier.

Treats

Treats are not only a great training tool, but also a way to provide variety and enrichment to your pet's life and routine. Do not feed more than ½ tablespoon per day. Below is a short compilation of safe and unsafe foods for sugar gliders. For a more complete guide, view the comprehensive list created by Critter Love.

Safe Treats

apples

asparagus

bananas

bell peppers

blackberries

blueberries

broccoli

Brussels sprouts

cabbage

carrots

cantaloupe

cauliflower

cranberries

cucumbers

cooked eggs

grapefruit

green beans

kale

kiwi

mango

papaya

parsley

pear

peas

pumpkin

raspberries

spinach

squash

sweet pepper

watermelon

Unsafe Treats

apple seeds

birdseed

caffeine

candy

chocolate

canned food

cassava

catnip

cheese

junk food

onions

garlic

crickets

decorative bamboo

dog food

cat food

fried foods

fruit pits

peanuts

peanut butter

pepper

raw eggs

raw meat

rhubarb

salt

insects not raised for pet food

DISCLAIMER

All information shared by MN Pocket Pet Rescue is researched, up to date, and accurate to the best of our ability. We are not a licensed veterinary organization and do not intend to present ourselves as such. All educational material contains our best recommendations for care specific to each species. However, all animals are different and some may have unique needs. MN Pocket Pet Rescue does not assume any liability for the well-being of any animal not under our care. Always use your best judgment and follow veterinary recommendations whenever necessary. If you have any questions or find inaccurate information please contact us.