MEET THE RABBIT

Rabbits are not technically rodents, but lagomorphs, which are closely related. There are many different breeds of rabbits which creates a huge range of sizes, shapes, coat types, colors, and personalities. Rabbits have quickly become one of the most popular types of pocket pets due to their size, potty trainability, and adorable ears!

Lifespan

8 - 10 years

Diet Difficulty

Medium

Good With Kids

Older/respectful children

Care Difficulty

Medium

Space Requirement

Large

Cleanliness

Medium

Time Needed Outside Cage

High

Human Interaction Needs

High

Potty Trainability

High

Cuddliness

Low

CARE GUIDE

SUPPLY LIST

ADOPTABLE

RABBITS

ENCLOSURE REQUIREMENTS

MNPPR Recommends

Exercise Pens

C & C Cage

One of the best cage options is a homemade cage called a C&C (cubes and coroplast) cage. They are fairly easy to make and are quite inexpensive compared to cages sold at pet stores. They are also very easy to clean and provide appropriate space. The bigger the better! If you decide to put in a ramp to add a second story, make sure it is long with a gradual incline and traction on the bottom so your rabbit can easily use it.

Minimum Dimensions

One rabbit: 12 sq ft

Two rabbits: 12 - 24 sq ft

Three rabbits: 24 - 36 sq ft

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Other Notes

Be sure there is enough room for your rabbit to stretch out, hop 3 - 4 times across the length of the habitat, and stand on their back legs without touching the roof. 

 

Most rabbit cages you find in the stores are much too small on their own. It is recommended to either build your own cage or expand your cage with fencing or an exercise pen.

 

Pocket pets should never be housed outside as they are vulnerable to predators, parasites, and weather conditions. 

 

MNPPR strongly recommends avoiding all wood-based beddings due to the general sensitivity of pocket pets. We like to use fleece to line the cage and cover any exposed wire floors, then use paper bedding as litter placed in a litter box. When the fleece is soiled, simply throw it in the wash and replace it as needed. Some rabbits can be trained to use a litter box, which can make cleaning even easier.

 

Some rabbits do well free-range in the house or in their own room once they have been litter box trained, as long as the area has been rabbit-proofed.

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ENRICHMENT REQUIREMENTS

Essentials

water bowl

food bowl

lots of chew toys (wood or lava)

at least one shelter/hide

Variety

toilet paper tubes

fiddlesticks

tunnels

bird toys

bits of fabric

ladders

cardboard

treat balls

homemade toys

Other Items

pet bed

pet carrier

fleece

litter (soft recycled paper

such as CareFresh, shredded paper,

or paper pellets)

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FEEDING REQUIREMENTS

Hay

Rabbits’ digestive systems require a constant supply of hay to function properly. An unlimited supply of timothy hay, orchard grass, and/or meadow grass should be available for them to eat at all times. Adult rabbits should not be given alfalfa since its calcium content is too high and can cause stones to form. Place hay in the litter box to encourage use and hay consumption.

Leafy Greens / Fresh Vegetables

Each day, offer about 1 cup of veggies per 2 lbs of body weight per rabbit. The bulk of this should be leafy greens, such as romaine, green leaf, or red leaf lettuce. Iceberg lettuce should never be given as it can cause diarrhea. 

Leafy Greens

75% of daily fresh food.

arugula

basil

bok choy

dandelion greens

dill

endive

green leaf lettuce

kale

mint

mustard greens

parsley

red leaf lettuce

romaine lettuce

spring greens

swiss chard

turnip greens

watercress

wheatgrass

Vegetables

15 - 25% of daily fresh food.

broccoli

brussels sprouts

carrots

celery

cucumber

radicchio

spinach

summer squash

zucchini squash

Pellets

Rabbits weighing 1 - 4 pounds should be given 1/8 cup pellets daily. Rabbits weighing 5 - 8 pounds should be given 1/4 cup pellets daily. Rabbits weighing 8 - 10 pounds should be given 1/2 cup pellets daily. Rabbits weighing 12 pounds and up should be given 3/4 cup pellets daily. Speak with your vet to determine if the pellet amount you are feeding is appropriate for your pet. Do not feed alfalfa hay or pellets to adult rabbits as they are high in calcium and can cause bladder stones. Pellets are not a substitute for hay! MNPPR prefers to use Oxbow brand pellets.

Treats

There are a lot of store-bought treats on the market made for rabbits but fresh fruits and vegetables can also make great treats.

Fruit

Treats only.

apples

bananas

berries

cherries

kiwi

mango

melons

nectarines

peaches

pears

Unsafe Treats

Do not feed.

avocado

chocolate

dairy 

garlic

meat

nuts

onion

potato

rhubarb

tomato leaves

DISCLAIMER

All information shared by MN Pocket Pet Rescue is researched, up to date, and accurate to the best of our ability. We are not a licensed veterinary organization and do not intend to present ourselves as such. All educational material contains our best recommendations for care specific to each species. However, all animals are different and some may have unique needs. MN Pocket Pet Rescue does not assume any liability for the well-being of any animal not under our care. Always use your best judgment and follow veterinary recommendations whenever necessary. If you have any questions or find inaccurate information please contact us.

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© 2021 by Burpingcake. Stock photos from Canstock.

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